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arthritis, osteoarthritis, JOINT PAIN, INFLAMMATION

Getting Relief from Arthritis Pain

Posted on January 05, 2018 by Erin Boynton, M.D.

WHAT CAUSES ARTHRITIS? [...]

arthritis, osteoarthritis

Sports Medicine Physician Recommends Body Helix Compression to Patients

Posted on December 04, 2017 by Body Helix

Sports Medicine Physician, Todd McGrath, MD, from Philadelphia, PA, had this awesome information to share regarding one of his patients.  If you are someone you know is suffering from arthritis, consider a Body Helix sleeve... it might be just the thing that helps you! [...]

achillies tendonitis, heel pain

How to Deal with Achilles Tendonitis

Posted on December 04, 2017 by Erin Boynton, M.D.

[...]

exercise, pain, doms

6 Ways to Ease Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

Posted on November 27, 2017 by Erin Boynton, M.D.

If you’ve ever hit the gym really hard, you’ve probably suffered through this particularly nasty workout hangover. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, or DOMS if you want to impress your meathead friends, is the muscular pain, stiffness, and soreness you feel 24-48 hours after you worked them, and can last up to ten days. Eccentric muscular contractions, in which the muscle is lengthened, make you especially susceptible to DOMS. Now, while DOMS can be extremely painful, it isn’t pathological — it’s just a bunch of muscular micro injuries which, given time, will repair themselves and make you stronger. That being said, I don't recommend regularly pushing yourself to such extremes where you become so sore the next day that walking up stairs feels like ascending Everest. However, if you do happen to suffer from DOMS, here are some things you can do: 1. HYDRATE Hydrating before your workout can help prevent DOMS, and hydrating when you’re hurting can help treat it. You see, stiff muscles aren’t just overworked—they’re thirsty. Dehydrated tissue is hard and dry, but when you down your water bottle or sports drink, some of that water makes its way to the dry tissue, and it regains some of that lost suppleness.      2. ALTERNATE BETWEEN HOT AND COLD TREATMENTS  Personally, I like to begin with an ice bath, but I’m somewhat of a glutton for punishment and I know not everyone can take the chill. Still, it is good to start with something cold, and then alternate between cold and hot, like moving between an ice pack and heating pad every five minutes. This increases blood supply to the affected muscles which, in turn, accelerates the healing process.  3. WEAR COMPRESSION GEAR Compression gear, like Body Helix compression sleeves, give your body a tight little hug, increasing the blood supply to all-those nutrition-hungry muscles. When used for injury management, there isn’t a better compression product available. Many of you are familiar with the RICE (Rest, Ice, COMPRESSION, Elevation) method of treatment. This method has been around for decades, proving its value when it comes to treating an injury. Compression treatment of the supporting muscles and tendons eases the burden on the injured tissue. In addition, increased blood flow and reduced fatigue have been scientifically proven with use of compression products. 4. TAKE AN IBUPROFEN Will an ibuprofen help repair all those muscular micro injuries? No, but it will help reduce the pain, which will make it easier for you to move, and that will help you heal.  5. MOVE AROUND If you’re hurting from DOMS, it can be very tempting to spend the day in bed or splayed out on the couch, but it’s important to move around so you can flush out the muscles.  At the very least, you need to get up and walk a bit, but I’d also recommend some light cardio if you can manage it. Personally, I like to hop on my spin bike and dial the resistance down to zero, and just go nice and easy for 20 minutes. 6. STRETCH  Finally, you need to stretch your muscles and work through that stiffness. If it’s your arms that are sore, start by gently moving them in every which way, slowly working towards regaining your full range of motion. Once you start moving and stretching, you’ll start to feel better pretty quickly, but as soon as you stop that stiffness will set right back in. So move as much as you can, but try not to overdo it — it may be active recovery, but it’s still recovery.     [...]

motivation, inspiration

Need a Little Inspiration?

Posted on November 20, 2017 by Erin Boynton, M.D.

We all need a little motivation and inspiration now and then. [...]

exercise

Why You Should Switch Up Your Exercise Routine

Posted on November 13, 2017 by Erin Boynton, M.D.

If we do the same motion over and over again, two things happen: 1. Imbalances develop from overuse. 2. The musculoskeletal system adapts, and your strength, flexibility, and endurance plateau. Thankfully, there's a pretty easy solution -- switch things up! Now, this could be something as simple as trying something new. Instead of biking, go for a swim. Instead of running, go for a bike ride. However, you can also just change the kinds of motion you're doing during your activity. For example, if you're a weightlifter who likes to go hard and heavy, maybe try a session of low weights and high repetitions. If you usually play goalie in your pickup hockey games, why not give another position a try for a week. When we stimulate our musculoskeletal system in new ways, the body is forced to adapt. So whatever you do,  just keep your body guessing!     [...]

Injury Prevention, injury management, age

Aging in Sports

Posted on November 03, 2017 by Candice Case

Body Helix is excited to have Guest Blogger, Candice Case, join us today.  Case is a certified group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and CrossFit coach.  Read on to see what Case has to say about the topic of aging in sports and what it means for today's athlete.  [...]

Tennis, tendonitis of the shoulder, shoulder, shoulder pain, shoulder injuries, frozen shoulder, labral tear, arthritis of the shoulder

Common Shoulder Injuries and How to Get Relief

Posted on November 01, 2017 by Thomas Parker, MD

We are always careful not to give medical advice. Please seek a medical evaluation for prolonged or severe pain. [...]

Injury, pain

Pain is the Body's Voice

Posted on October 23, 2017 by Erin Boynton, M.D.

Most of us think of pain only as suffering. And not just suffering, but suffering in its most raw and physical form. Of course, this is for good reason—pain, whether it’s from a scraped knee or broken arm, is a distinctly unpleasant sensation. Pain hurts. This perception of pain is what defines our relationship to it. Pain is something we hate and fear, like an invisible bogeyman hiding in our bodies always ready to do us harm.  So what do we do when we feel pain? We try to get rid of it. Headache? Take these painkillers. Nasty breakup? Drown your pain in Pinot Grigio. But if we look at pain objectively, we’ll see that pain isn’t bad at all. Pain is our body’s voice, and what it’s telling us is our body is out of balance. If you swim underwater long enough, you’ll feel pain in your lungs. That’s your body telling you it needs oxygen. If you put your hand on a hot stove, you’ll feel burning pain in your hand. That’s your body telling you your hand is overheating. If you don’t drink anything all day, you’ll feel parched. That’s your body telling you it needs water. In each of these examples, pain is a message telling us something is wrong. If we listen to the message, we can fix the problem. If your body needs oxygen, you come up for air. If your hand is in danger, you move it. If you’re thirsty, you drink.  But if we ignore the message, the problem gets worse, and if we ignore it long enough, the problem can even kill us. Stay underwater for ten minutes and you’ll drown. Don’t drink for a week and you’ll die of dehydration.    Of course, our body’s voice isn’t always that easy to understand. Even something as simple as a headache can have more than a dozen causes, from bad posture to all that Pinot Grigio. But if we can learn to listen, we’ll become more attuned to the imbalances in our body.  [...]

arthritis, knee, osteoarthritis, runner's knee, jumper's knee, patellar tendonitis, knee pain, patellofemoral pain syndrome

Top Three Most Common Knee Injuries

Posted on October 16, 2017 by Thomas Parker, MD

Our knees take a beating. Whether you are walking, jogging, or just doing every day activities you are putting pressure on your knees. This revealing information is provided by Harvard Health Publications: [...]

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